Art in unconventional spaces

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Something I took for granted over the course of my undergraduate career is how different the work you make is when fueled by a community. Often, the reality of the world you are thrust out upon graduation is very different from the environment that a studio art program fosters. I’m lucky to count one of my former classmates among my very dearest of friends, Amber Davis Briggs, whose art I have seen develop over the course of our studies. At some point, we realized that while we were expressing different things in different ways through our work, there were some commonalities that complimented each other. In one of those conversations, that is fueled by positive creative energy, the idea, the need to exhibit work after graduation formed. Typically I do not find myself expressing ideas through the usage of installation, however, I have had ideas teeming in my head waiting for the right moment.  We both felt the pull, there was work waiting to be made, we just had to do it. As with many freshly graduated artists, the opportunities to exhibit work in traditional spaces is earned over time, and can be a daunting prospect and can stunt the creative process.

Typically I do not find myself expressing ideas through the usage of installation, however, I have had ideas teeming in my head waiting for the right moment.  We both felt the pull, there was work waiting to be made, we just had to do it. As with many freshly graduated artists, the opportunities to exhibit work in traditional spaces is earned over time, and can be a daunting prospect and can stunt the creative process. We hatched the idea, with the support of our very welcoming and generous Nashville art community, to install our work in an untraditional space. It would be temporary, for one night only during the monthly neighborhood art crawl, and it would be accessible for us to achieve (ie: not cost prohibitive). I had seen the example of some pioneering artists to utilize a moving van as a movable temporary exhibition space and we decided to follow suit. I still can’t believe we did it, but I think our mutual education helped us to be brave and push where and how art can be presented. Somehow we pulled it off. 

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Somehow we pulled it off. Even when the truck we received was significantly larger than the one we reserved, through lightning and thunderstorms, and Nashville traffic. Luckily we had each other to push each other to make it happen. I know I couldn’t have done it on my own. Many thanks to Amber Davis Briggs, my partner in art, the members of the Coop Gallery for their support and encouragement, the Packing Plant for allowing us to park outside, U-haul of course, and the many, many enthusiastic art patrons who braved the ramp or the steps to venture into something unconventional.

 

 

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